OXFORD POLITICAL QUOTATIONS

OXFORD POLITICAL QUOTATIONS

por ANTHONY (ED.) JAY

This revised new edition, now available as a handy pocket-sized paperback, provides more than 4,500 quotations, covering the people, events, and ideas of some 2,500 years of politics: the inspiring speeches and the disastrous gaffes. Antony Jay has selected the best sayings of and about politicians both past and present, ranging from Karl Marx to George W. Bush and Elizabeth I to Ken Livingstone, and touching on subjects as diverse as warfare, nationalism, honesty, and the ever-sensitive issue of taxation. Newspaper headlines, Slogans, and other special categories are grouped together for easier access, and an extensive index helps you to find out who really said that half-remembered phrase. With the addition of Sound bites of 2000-4, events covered include the terrorist attacks of September 11th, wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, and the enlargement of the European Union. States like these...constitute an axis of evil. --George W. Bush A good day to bury bad news. --Summary of Jo Moore's email of September 11th There is no list, and Syria isn't on it. --Jack Straw According to Dean Acheson, 'The first requirement of a statesman is that he be dull.' But people don't always do what they're supposed to do, as illustrated by the more than 4,000 political quotations compiled by Antony Jay. Trenchant, morbid, ironic, or inane, these bon mots from prominent leaders are everything but dull. The dictionary is arranged alphabetically, running the lexical gamut from British Labour politician Diane Abbott (who opined 'Being an MP is the sort of job all working-class parents want for their children--clean, indoors and no heavy lifting') to French novelist Emile Zola, who said simply, 'J'accuse.' But there is also a subject index that allows you to search for witticisms featuring the words 'rotten,' 'bicker,' 'subversion,' or 'handkerchief.' In political history, perspective is all. Reading the words of Prince Metternich ('Error has never approached my spirit') and H.L. Mencken ('Puritanism. The haunting fear that someone, somewhere, may be happy') is as instructive about the past as it is about the present. It makes for fun browsing, too. --Stephanie Gold